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Showing posts from September, 2014

MIKE SMITH photo realist painter

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Inspired by the classicists, my paintings demonstrate the same love of rich fabrics against the figure that painters such as Lord Leighton, John William Godward and Lawrence Alma-Tadema expressed in their work.
 I feel my work creates a sense of place with the figure totally at ease, making the interior, or secluded corner of an English country garden, a place of quiet contemplation. I use light on the figure to enhance the natural form of the model, with deep shadow dramatising the atmosphere of the moment, and accentuating the detail in the contrasting textures of textiles and flesh. A mirrored image occurs in several of my paintings leading the viewer into the same world as the model but only able to imagine her thoughts. I am excited by this sense of mystery but it is always important that the models in my work are believable although they may exist in a dream like or theatrical setting.
I hope my paintings go beyond the "photographic" as the qualities of the paint and …

The Top Ten Nudes

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The nude, a subject in itself in the history of Western art and the theme of numerous major cross-disciplinary exhibitions, is not treated here as a particular "genre". Artprice.com has sought out works featuring one or more naked bodies, irrespective of the period of creation, to determine the ten works with the highest price indexes in the auction market. What emerges is the supremacy of modern and post-war art, with Peter Paul Rubens providing the only Old Master. This Top Ten, which includes two sculptures (by Matisse and Giacometti) in comparison with eight paintings, takes us on a short journey through a history of art where the nude recounts a great deal more than mere nudity. The nude as a pretext for form in two sculptures 

Alberto Giacometti's Walking Man I: a life-sized bronze (183 cm), cast in an edition of six, sold for $92.5 million, or $103.6 million including the buyer's premium, in 2010. If not an artist of the nude, Giacometti treated his walking men…