Giuseppe De Nittis, the Italian Great...


The Italian Great who died to early at the age of 38

Giuseppe De Nittis
















Self portrait.




 (February 25, 1846 – August 21, 1884)[1] was n Italian painter whose work merges the styles of Salon art and Impressionism.






De Nittis was born in Barletta, where he first studied under Giovanni Battista Calò. After being expelled in 1863 from the Instituto di Belle Arti in Naples for insubordination, he launched his career with the exhibition of two paintings at the 1864 Neapolitan Promotrice. De Nittis came into contact with some of the artists known as the Macchiaioli, becoming friends with Telemaco Signorini, and exhibiting in Florence.

In 1867 he moved to Paris and entered into a contract with the art dealer Adolphe Goupil which called for him to produce saleable genre works. After gaining some visibility by exhibiting at the Salon he returned to Italy where, now free to paint from nature, he produced several views of Vesuvius.




A trip to London resulted in a number of Impressionistic paintings. On a subsequent trip to Italy De Nittis took up pastels, which were to be an important medium for him in his remaining years. Back in Paris, where his home was a favorite gathering place for Parisian writers and artists, as well as expatriate Italians, he executed pastel portraits of sitters including De GoncourtZolaManet and Duranty.





In 1872 De Nittis returned to Paris and, no longer under contract to Goupil, achieved a success at the Salon with his painting Che freddo! (Freezing!) of 1874. In that same year he was invited to exhibit at the first Impressionist exhibition, held at Nadar's. The invitation came from Edgar Degas, who was a friend of several Italian artists residing in Paris, including Telemaco Signorini, Giovanni Boldini and Federico Zandomeneghi.


































In 1884, at the age of 38, De Nittis died suddenly of a stroke at Saint-Germain-en-Laye.






Works by De Nittis are in many public collections, including the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, British Museum in London, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. His paintings Return from the Races and The Connoisseurs are in the Philadelphia Museum of Art.






Regards,
Chris van Dijk.


Comments

  1. Very Nice Art work my friend. Thank you for sharing them. It was very thoughtful of you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Steven,
      Thanks for you comment !
      Wish you well,
      Best, Chris van Dijk.

      Delete
    2. I also thank you for sharing these paintings, and will share them with friends in the Kalkan Art Group, Antalya Turkey. Most of us are retired and have taken up painting as a hobby, we find it relaxing and ALWAYS enjoy looking at Art work,
      It is such a pity Giuseppe De Nittis died at such an early age.

      Delete
  2. J'ai découvert ce blog récemment e je suis très content de voir un article dédié à un auteur qui è né et vécu dans ma région, la Puglia en Italie, mais qui est sous-estimé dans sa ville. J'ai eu l'occasion de visiter la galerie qui porte son nom et où on trouve ses oeuvre è Barletta et je ne peut que conseiller de le voir.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you very much for this blog!
    It's great to see all the pictures! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Dominika, You're welcome !! best Chris van Dijk.

      Delete
  4. Thank you for all the beautiful art work and the story of man who created them.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Dear T.Stonefield,
    Thank you for the kind words !
    Best, Chris van Dijk.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Gracias por compartir la obra y la vida de estos artistas.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hello Nelly, Thank you so much for the kind comment ! wishing you the best, Chris van Dijk.

    ReplyDelete

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